A Mortons or intermetatarsal neuroma

The Mortons or intermetatarsal neuroma is an impingement of the nerve, usually between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads. It's because of a fibrosis around the nerve tissue, but it does get termed a ‘neuroma’ even though it is not actually a neuroma. It's more common in females in their forties to sixties, suggesting that more restrictive footwear could possibly be part of the issue.

The primary signs are shooting pains into the toes that progressively gets worse, however it is not always a shooting kind of pain to start with. Signs may differ from one person to another with some just experiencing a tingling of the forefoot, and many simply a slight tingling to burning type pains. Later on there is often an severe pain which can be present much of the time. It usually is between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads, but can occur in between any of them. Compressing the ball of the foot from the sides might produce the discomfort and often a click may be felt with the finger of the other hand while compressing the ball of the foot. This is whats called a Mulder’s click.

The cause is suspected to be an impingement on the nerve tissue by the adjacent metatarsal head, setting up a ‘pinched nerve’; the most obvious being using footwear that happen to be too tight round the ball of the feet. Also excessive movement of the metatarsal heads may also be a factor, particularly during sporting exercise. Being overweight is also a common finding in people that have a Morton’s Neuroma.

Traditional treatment generally begins with advice on the correct fitting of shoes and the use of metatarsal pads or domes. The shoes needs to be wide enough to stop the compression of the metatarsal heads and if possible have a lower heel height. If that is not helpful, then a surgical excision of the neuroma is advised. From time to time the Mortons neuroma is helped by injection therapy to try and break down the neuroma and cryosurgery is also sometimes tried.

 

 

More Energy Required for Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

The biomechanics and function of the mid-foot ( arch ) of the feet are essential to normal walking and running gait and biomechanics. The support of the arch of the foot is looked after by a number of things, such as the shape of the bones, the ligaments, the muscles and the plantar fascia. One of the key muscles in the dynamic stability of the arch of the feet are the posterior tibial muscle. It is a strong muscle that is in the lower leg. The tendon of this muscle passes on the medial side of the ankle joint and attaches below the bones that make up the mid-part of the arch of the feet, so this particular muscle is really essential for stabilizing the arch. In many individuals, the posterior tibial muscle appears to lose it capability to stabilize the foot, causing a disorder referred to as posterior tibial tendon dysfunction or adult acquired flat foot.

This disorder usually commences with a moderate discomfort in the arch or inside of the ankle joint and the arch of the foot gradually lowers and the rearfoot rolls inwards (pronates). This is all because of the muscle being unable to do its job properly. If therapy is not started, then the pain and deformity progresses. In its end stages it usually is quite debilitating and painful. It gradually has a major affect on quality of life and also the ability to walk. It's very exhausting as so much energy is required to walk with Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

Because the long term consequences of this disorder may be so disabling, it is crucial that it must be detected as soon as possible and treatment begun. The lengthier the delay the more difficult it is to treat. During the early stages, the only satisfactory intervention usually are very hard or rigid foot orthotics. They need to be rigid as the forces which are flattening the feet are so high that they need to be countered. A less rigid support will do nothing. A high top hiking or basketball like shoe or sneaker can also be beneficial at supporting the ankle joint. If this is not adequate then more complex ankle braces would be the next stage. If this fails or the treatment is started far too late, then surgery is usually the only satisfactory intervention at this late stage.

 

 

The Most Simplest Way to Manage Hallux Rigidus

Hallux Rigidus is a condition in when the motion at the big toe or hallux joint of the foot is rigid and is usually connected with osteoarthritis. The big toe joint of the feet are actually quite an important joint in the body as it needs to flex so the leg can progress over the feet when walking. If something hinders the motion at that joint, then forward movement is going to be a lot harder and strain could be added to other joints that have to bend more as that joint just isn't bending properly. This could result in pain in the great toe or hallux joint as well as other joints. In addition, it will cause an excessive wear pattern on the shoes. The most important cause of hallux rigidus is commonly a previous injury to the joint. After a while this sets up a process of abnormal use that leads to further damage and osteoarthritis to the joint. Subsequently the limited motion of the joint is even further restricted and the joint becomes rigid with no motion possible.

The  simplest way to manage Hallux Rigidus is appropriate therapy for the original trauma with excellent rehabilitation and the use of exercises in order to avoid or slow down the developments of the osteoarthritis. When the joint is painful, then medications and injection therapy into the joint can be used for the pain. The use of a firmer sole footwear is often helpful as this decreases the demand on the joint to bend. Some footwear can also have a rocker added to them, so that you will pivot over the rocker and don't need to use the joint as much. If these conservative measures are not helpful, then the alternative is surgical. There are various options here. The easiest, if indicated, is to simply cut off some bone of the top of the joint to allow to move more. If that's not feasible, then the joint can be surgically fused to prevent it flexing. This kind of fusion addresses the pain from the osteoarthritis since the joint is unable to flex.

 

 

When Severs Disease Occurs

There are numerous causes of heel pain in adults, but in children the commonest by far is a condition known as Severs disease. Since this is an injury to the growing plate at the back of the heel bone, it wouldn't happen in adults. The most common age of developing is about the early teenage years or maybe a bit before. When we are born the heel bone develops from two parts, one being the major area of the heel bone and another being the growth area at the back of the heel bone. These two zones of bone are split up by a zone of cartilage. Severs disease occurs when there is a lot of force on that area of cartilage.

The leading causes are simply excessive activity done to increasing amounts so that the bone does not get enough time to get used to the stress that are placed on it. Almost always the child is involved with a great deal of sports activity, often on hard surfaces. Limited calf muscles can also be frequently present. The primary sign is soreness around the edges of the heel bone at the back of the heel and soreness on weightbearing. Increasing the amount of sporting activity also makes it worse.

The important approach to the management is a lowering of physical activity so that load on the growing zone of bone is reduced. Commonly a soft heel raise is required to protect the area and lower the force in the Achilles tendon. Ice after physical activity to help with pain can be useful. If this isn't helping, a further decrease in the amount of weightbearing activity is needed and in the most difficult cases, a walking brace or cast is utilized to substantially reduce activity levels. If all this does not help, which it occasionally does, then it is just a matter of coping with it until the two zones of growing bone merge to form one and this will not be a problem.

 

 

Back Massage With Ice: How Effective It Is?

Suffering from back pain is perhaps the most frustrating thing because it restricts you throughout. You will not be able to perform the daily tasks, which on a normal day, you would have performed quite easily. People who have hurt their backs before swearing to God that they will be more careful the next time, but they unintentionally trigger back pain again. If this is the case with you, then you must confirm whether you are not suffering from chronic back pain. If you have a doubt, even the slightest one, then don’t hesitate to get it checked by a professional.

Back pain is often caused by muscle strains. Twisting the back in a wrong manner, lifting something heavy or giving a jerk to the back can result in back pain. Those who call themselves sportspersons or athletes should also not assume that their back is going to hold up no matter what they do because back pain can occur just like that. One awkward move and your back are going to start hurting. You will rush towards pharmacists for a painkiller, but that is not the right thing to do. You must try out massage therapy, especially ‘ice massage’.

The benefits of applying ice on the injured back are, alleviating the pain, reduction of the blood flow, reduction in the inflammation and any internal bruising. The main motive of ice therapy is to promote healing in the injured part of the body. As soon as you feel discomfort in your back, you must take the ice massage.

There are many different ways of applying ice on your back. You can take half a dozen of ice cubes into a towel and apply it on your back. There are ready to use cold packs available on the market, so you can buy one of those and apply it on your back. These can be used multiple times, so keep the pack in the freezer and take it out when you have to use it. There is one thing that you have to keep in mind, i.e., don’t apply the ice directly on the skin as it will cause skin burn. If you can’t get an ice pack, then take some frozen vegetables like corn or peas and apply it on the damaged area.

If you have time to make an ice pack of your own, then you can take the paper cup that is made from Styrofoam. You need to fill the paper cup with water and put it in the freezer. Once the water is completely frozen, you can peel the Styrofoam up to a level where the ice gets exposed and you can use it to massage the injured area. If the pain is persistent, then put multiple cups in the freezer so that you have the ice pack when you need it.

Back massage using ice could be very effective if you apply it in the right area in the right manner. If the pain doesn’t reduce, then you must take the help of a medical practitioner like Back Solutions Clinic.

Using Lemons for Your Health

There is nothing better than a large glass of ice cold water or tea when it is hot outside or first thing in the morning when you are waking up. Now some of you will argue that coffee sound better first thing in the morning but discussion is for another time. So let us get back to that large cold glass of refreshing water. What if I told you that I could make that glass of ice cold water even better for you? Here is a very simple life hack that you can implement into your daily water drinking that will not only add some flavor to your water or tea but also add body approved nutrients.  So what is this glorious secret you may be asking yourself?

The answer is lemons.  Yes you heard that right those yellow orbs of deliciousness that you squeeze to make lemonade or put as a garnishment in a cool ‘adult’ drink.  Lemons are rich in Vitamin C with many benefits that include rejuvenating the skin, bringing a glow to the face, help with weight loss and helps to flush out toxins in your body and aid the digestive system, eliminating waste products from the body. It helps prevent constipation and diarrhea by ensuring regular bowel functions. Lemons are also rich in calcium and potassium. It helps maintain our immune systems, protecting us from infections. So put a little kick into that ice water or even tea by adding a couple of lemon squeezes and wedges.  You can contact ApexMedicalAZ if you’d like to find out more about this subject.

The Short Term Relief of Cracked heels

Splits in the epidermis around the heel are frequent, are uncomfortable, and never look very good. They happen when the fat pad beneath the heel expands out sideways beneath the foot and the dry skin cracks or splits to develop a heel fissure. A great way to understand these is to use the example of a tomato being compressed. As you apply pressure to the tomato to squash it, the skin of the tomato splits as the insides forces outwards. So it is with the heel. As bodyweight squashes the fat beneath the heel it stretches out sideways from under the heel, it tries to split the skin around the perimeter of the heel. If it is successful or not will probably depend on how supple and resilient that the epidermis is. If the skin is dry, thicker or callused, it is going to tear very easily. If the skin is thicker with a layer of callus, that skin will crack easily and place a strain on the good skin below that can become somewhat painful, perhaps bleeding. Every step which is taken with further more open the split which will help prevent it from getting better. Cracked heels are more prevalent in those that use open heel type footwear, as a closed in shoe will help keep the fat pad beneath the heel in position and help stop or lessen the effects of this.

The most efficient short term relief of cracked heels is to have the callused skin cut back by a podiatrist and then use tape to hold the edges of the split together so that it can mend. The long term protection against cracked skin around the heel should be apparent from the process that was described above. To begin with, weight reduction will help reduce the problem, but this is a long term concern. To help prevent the fat pad under the heel from broadening out sideways and trying to crack the skin, a closed in shoe needs to be used and frequently the use of deep heel cup inserts can help. A podiatric doctor should be consulted on a regular basis to cut back any thick callused skin. Creams should be applied regularly to keep the skin resilient so that it does not fissure. The use of filing tools to keep the thick skin under control may also be used.

 

 

The Mortons or Intermetatarsal Neuroma

The Mortons or intermetatarsal neuroma is an impingement of the nerve, usually between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads. It's because of a fibrosis around the nerve tissue, but it does get termed a ‘neuroma’ even though it is not actually a neuroma. It's more common in females in their forties to sixties, suggesting that more restrictive footwear could possibly be part of the issue.

The primary signs are shooting pains into the toes that progressively gets worse, however it is not always a shooting kind of pain to start with. Signs may differ from one person to another with some just experiencing a tingling of the forefoot, and many simply a slight tingling to burning type pains. Later on there is often an severe pain which can be present much of the time. It usually is between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads, but can occur in between any of them. Compressing the ball of the foot from the sides might produce the discomfort and often a click may be felt with the finger of the other hand while compressing the ball of the foot. This is whats called a Mulder’s click.

The cause is suspected to be an impingement on the nerve tissue by the adjacent metatarsal head, setting up a ‘pinched nerve’; the most obvious being using footwear that happen to be too tight round the ball of the feet. Also excessive movement of the metatarsal heads may also be a factor, particularly during sporting exercise. Being overweight is also a common finding in people that have a Mortons Neuroma .

Traditional treatment generally begins with advice on the correct fitting of shoes and the use of metatarsal pads or domes. The shoes needs to be wide enough to stop the compression of the metatarsal heads and if possible have a lower heel height. If that is not helpful, then a surgical excision of the neuroma is advised. From time to time the Mortons neuroma is helped by injection therapy to try and break down the neuroma and cryosurgery is also sometimes tried.

 

 

How I Ended Up With Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a pretty awful condition.  I know because I lived with it for about a decade.  For those that don’t know, plantar fasciitis causes pain on the bottom of the foot between the front of the heel and the ball of the foot.  It’s usually way worse after getting out of bed in the morning because the foot (technically, the fascia) tightens up over night.  So when you step down off the bed, the first couple steps actually feel like something in the foot is tearing and it’s a really sharp type of pain.  After you get moving it tends to loosen up and is only a little painful.

Personally, I had great feet for most of my life.  Then one day my wife and I decided to paint the interior of our house.  I was feeling lazy that day and never changed out of my pajamas or put on shoes.  I was up and down the ladder that day hundreds of times in my bare feet and toward the end of the day my arches were really aching.  The next day was the first day I felt that sharp pain in my feet, and it never went away!  I didn’t understand back then, but recently I started seeing a chiropractor Chandler AZ and he explained everything and has been working on my feet and they are finally starting to feel better.  Check out http://www.apexmedicalaz.com/ for more information about it.

Workplace Ergonomics and Avoiding Injury

As an adult nearly 70% of our time during the day is spent sitting and probably working on a computer. Extended amounts of time sitting and working on a computer can be taxing to your body, especially your spine.  When sitting for a long period of time your body begins to conform to the flexed position which can cause excessive amounts of strain on your neck and back which may cause headaches, pain and increase degeneration. Proper ergonomics in the workplace are vital for a healthy working environment. Ergonomics is defined as the study of efficiency in the working environment. Many large and even some small businesses spend tons of money to make sure that their employees have proper ergonomics to reduce the chances of work related injuries. Some common signs and symptoms of poor work ergonomics include; headaches, blurry vision, neck pain, low back pain, muscle pain and fatigue, shoulder slouching and slouching position.

Our bodies are meant to move and when we sit for extended periods of time then certain muscles become atrophied (weak) and joints become stiff. Moving and/or stretching throughout  the day can help to stimulate different muscle groups and prevent excessive wear and tear on to your body.  Some simple tips to make sure that your workplace ergonomics are allowing you to perform at or as close to 100% includes: insure your desk and computer screen are at a proper height, your feet touch the floor, your keyboard allows your wrist and forearms to sit parallel to the floor and your shoulders are perpendicular and always try and sit up nice and tall.  Find out more about this subject by going to www.ApexMedicalAZ.com.